Spain – sliding down the Greece-y pole

A condensed version of the Greek tragedy in recent years: 1) A new government comes to power and finds that the true state of the public finances is much worse than the previous government admitted to. 2) They want to stay in the Eurozone because their people finally have a currency they trust, and so they solemnly promise their European partners that they will do whatever it takes to ensure this occurs. 3) An eye-wateringly aggressive fiscal austerity package is announced by the new government. 4) The sharp fall in expected public sector demand in the economy leads to a significant recession, unemployment rises sharply, welfare spending rises more than expected, tax revenues come in lower than expected and the fiscal deficit does not improve. 5) The government finds that foreigners no longer want to buy the debt it needs to sell in order to finance the deficit, so it forces its bank and insurance companies to buy the debt. 6) They are not keen despite high yields and so will only buy short-dated Treasury Bills of less than one year rather than bonds with longer maturities. 7) Yields on government bonds rise to levels at which it becomes impossible for the government to issue any more bonds and the deteriorating creditworthiness of the government debt means that the sovereign debt crisis is now also an existential crisis for the domestic banking sector. 8) The rest of Europe provides funds for a bailout, not to help out the distressed sovereign but to help out their own banking sectors who have massive exposures to both government and banks of the affected country. 9) This bailout from Europe comes with a price of even greater and more immediate austerity. 10) Youth unemployment soars to tragic levels as recession bites even deeper. 11) The country is bust.

Spain’s recent history is putting it on the same road to misery that Greece has travelled in recent years. 1, 2, 3 and 4 have already occurred and 5 is coming into sight, although Spain has taken advantage of the recent period of positive sentiment surrounding the ECB’s LTRO announcements to raise a good part of this year’s debt requirements. However 10-year yields of over 6% for an economy that is likely to show barely any nominal economic growth in the next few years, are not sustainable for very long, and foreign investors are likely not to want to commit more funds to Spain. The LTROs did however facilitate a move towards 6 as the 3-year fixed-rate financing allowed the Spanish banks to make arbitrage profits by buying debt with less than 3 years to maturity – the data suggest many Spanish banks did this.

Spain’s problems are different to Greece in two ways. First, whilst the initial Greek problem was a massive under-estimate of how much debt was owed by the government due to creative accounting, Spain’s problem is that the regional governments in the country have been busily running up debts which are seen effectively as debts of the national government, even though the national government has little political or financial control over the regions. Secondly much of the Spanish banking system has urgent solvency problems following the boom and bust in Spanish house prices over the last decade – the banks need more external capital and it probably has to be the government which has to supply it. The worse the austerity-induced recession, the lower house prices will fall, the worse is the solvency position of the Spanish banking system, and it becomes even more impossible for the Spanish economy to grow its way out of its problems. A move to 7 in Spain could happen faster than many think.

Moving to 8 – a bailout for Spain would be the critical moment for Europe. Greece, Ireland and Portugal together account for about 6% of the Eurozone economy, but Spain accounts for about 12%, so the scale of bailout assistance would triple. For Northern European countries this could well be a bailout too far.

As has always been the case since the crisis started, the solution depends on which of the 3 bad options Germany decides to opt for – either a full political and fiscal union, or inflation caused by the ECB printing money or Germany leaves the euro.

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