On the QT

2009 saw the world embark on a giant economic experiment – that of Quantitative Easing (QE) in which Central Banks injected large amounts of money into their financial systems. Next month, the Federal Reserve announced this week, will see a new first for monetary policy – a policy of Quantitative Tightening (QT) in which money will be withdrawn from the financial system.
They have announced that this new policy will be phased in, starting at a rate of $10bn per month from October, rising each quarter to $50bn per month by October 2018. At the same time, they expect to raise interest rate four more times to 2% by the end of 2018.
The timing of this policy shift appears less related to current economic conditions and much more to two other factors. First is that Western Central Banks appear, as a group, to have decided that the very easy monetary policies need to be pulled back. In addition to the Federal Reserve, the Bank of England has also recently indicated its desire to increase interest rates and the ECB is has laid out plans to bring to an end its QE programme. This tightening seems to be globally co-ordinated. Secondly, the Federal Reserve appears to be publicly setting out its policy for the next year, in such a way that it would be embarrassing not to carry it through. This comes at exactly the time that there are many places on the Federal Reserve Board to be filled over the next twelve months by nominees of President Trump, including the key role of Chairman currently filled by Janet Yellen.
Over the period of QE, from October 2008 to October 2014, the Federal Reserve increased its balance sheet from about $750bn to $4.5 trillion through 3 separate programmes of purchases. Its peak purchase rate was $85bn per month.
The widely accepted effects of the QE policy were:
1. It helped to offset the effects of the Global Financial Crisis in 2008/9, and prevented a 1930s style Depression from setting in.
2. It has done little to foster a rapid economic recovery, instead US GDP growth has stabilised at a muted 2% pa rate, only a little higher than the increase in population, and inflation has struggled to exceed 2%. There is little evidence that the increased money supply has found its way into the real economy through physical investment.
3. The prices of financial have moved much higher, principally through higher valuations relative to the income streams they produce. This is evident in house prices, stock prices, bond prices and the prices of prestige assets such as artwork and vintage cars. The increased money supply has thus remained within the financial economy rather than the real economy.
4. The combination of lacklustre real economic growth, rapid growth in financial asset prices, and the skewed distribution of wealth in the US economy has meant that the very wealthiest in 2008 have become even more wealthy and inequality has risen very substantially with the richest 0.1% gaining much more than the richest 1%, who gained much more than the richest 10% who gained much more than the rest of the population.
The implications of QT are thus that what has been to be a key support for financial market prices will be reversed by falling valuations as money is withdrawn from the financial system. It may also be that in fact this has a limited impact on the real economy as the decline in wealth will affect only the very wealthiest in society who demonstrate a low correlation between changes in their wealth and changes in their spending patterns.
A deeper concern is that QT will affect valuations in both equity and bond markets at the same time. Most investors have not seen an environment in which both markets fall simultaneously and this has the potential for aggressive selling of leveraged positions in markets, which could take markets down to surprisingly low levels.