Elections and political transitions in 2012 – January 2012

This year brings elections or organised transitions in political leadership in Russia, the US, China and France. Such periods can lead to unpredictability in economic policy ahead of these transitions as current leaders seek to avoid bad news in order either to win the election or to go out on a high. Similarly the period immediately after an election or leadership transition is usually one where the leader has most political capital and will generally seek to execute his or her most vital or most cherished policies. These may not necessarily be those policies which are most appropriate in an economic sense but are the most appropriate in a political sense. With so many transitions in such important nations this year, the scope for good politics to triumph over good economics is very large.

The US election is now underway with the Republican primaries firing the starting gun. The two parties are ideologically further apart than at any time in living memory (the phrase “class warfare” is being used a lot), and the Democrat President is unable to get the Republican Congress to agree to anything he wants to do. This year policy is in limbo, US politicians are unlikely to agree on doing anything  with regard to economic policy – this is understood and to some extent accepted by the markets, but action must be taken in 2013 to start reducing the fiscal deficit and the candidates are unlikely to reveal to the electorate just how bad things will need to be in terms of spending cuts or tax increases. In addition, upcoming elections require all candidates to stand up very strongly for American interests in any international dispute – in trade matters this can easily spill over into protectionist policies to “safeguard American jobs”.

In China, a new generation of leaders will come to power just before the US election – at the top level there will be no shocks but there is much manoeuvring still going on for the next level down, who will form the leadership team in five years time. Chinese officials will struggle to allow or tolerate “bad” economic news, and any further weakness of the type seen in recent months may well generate another dramatic stimulus response of the sort seen in early 2009. In foreign and trade policy also, it will be important for the Chinese to be seen to be stoutly defending their interests to safeguard Chinese jobs.

France is the most interesting story with its May Presidential elections. First it means that Sarkozy cannot allow anyone to leave the euro before the elections, because all his efforts over the last two years to “save the euro” would have visibly failed – therefore more summits and buying of time with new initiatives is very likely. However were he to remain President (unlikely from the current opinion polls), he would never have to face the French voters again – he could afford to try to be a European statesman and actually may be prepared to adopt a more German solution to the euro crisis, even at the expense of traditional French interests. By contrast markets might get a nasty shock were his main challenger Francois Hollande to win the Presidency. He is a fairly unreconstructed socialist, and would have few political soulmates in Europe, and has already declared that the current policies of austerity and institutional change to force countries into more restrictive fiscal policies are unacceptable to him. It is difficult to see Angela Merkel willing to give much of the ground that Hollande would require in order for France and Germany to continue to lead the efforts to save the euro. Either way the French election looks likely to be absolutely pivotal in determining which way the euro crisis gets resolved.

Amidst all this, the UK looks to be a rather stable place. The coalition looks set to soldier on – the Liberals cannot afford to leave since the ensuing election would see them almost wiped out, whilst Cameron benefits from pursuing the economic policies that he believes is necessary but seeing the blame laid on the Liberals. The economic policy of steady austerity has been set for the next few years and no change will be considered until much closer to the planned 2015 election. For Cameron, current economic policy is both economically and politically appropriate and he stands in a place that many of his fellow world leaders would wish to be.

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