A hard Brexit please

This week the government made clear its decision regarding the sort of Brexit it will be seeking. The red lines of control of immigration and withdrawal from the European Court of Justice’s jurisdiction represent the “taking back control” that the Leave campaign promised.

The other 27 countries in the EU have made abundantly clear that the price of Britain denying freedom of movement is that it cannot continue to be inside the single market –  the working definition of a hard Brexit. Thus some sort of agreement on how trade will be conducted between Britain and the EU will be required.

There appear to be two key areas to be negotiated before Britain actually leaves – (i) a transitional trade agreement pending a more permanent agreement which might take many years to conclude and (ii) an agreement on the financial services sector and the current passporting system.

It is interesting to note that the red lines regarding “taking back control” do not include the subject of the UK’s net contributions to the EU budget and it seems that Britain may be prepared to pay (financially) for a transitional trade agreement and agreement over continued financial services passporting. Whether this would be acceptable to the EU countries is not clear – the current payment from the UK of £18bn per year (which would presumably be the maximum that Britain would be prepared to pay), does not go very far when spread around 27 countries.

Whilst now is the time of maximum pessimism about Brexit negotiations -before formal talks have even begun and with each side setting out their red lines – Britain has lost goodwill in Europe over the last week following policy ideas announced at the Conservative Party ‘s regarding foreign-born workers.

Both Merkel and Hollande have made clear that it is important for them that Britain should be not be seen as having won anything by deciding to leave the EU, and though it is quite possible neither will be around to have much influence over the negotiations, their fellow-countrymen are unlikely to have very different ideas.

With important votes and elections in Italy, Spain, France, Netherlands and Germany over the next 12 months, little progress should be expected in the Brexit talks in that time period. This will prove negative to the world’s view of Britain – the pound has continued its post-referendum decline this week, and gilt yields have risen in anticipation of the higher inflation this is likely to create in the British economy.

International investors will at best defer further investment into the country and at worst begin making adjustments to their factory and office locations to reflect a Britain outside the single market. Any good news regarding the benefits of new trade agreements with other non-EU countries will have to await the outcome of talks to agree our relationship with the EU.

By announcing when it expects Article 50 to be triggered and its red lines, Britain has now entered a period of massive vulnerability for its economy. Maintaining the goodwill of the other EU countries should now be a key objective of foreign policy.